Rocky IV

1985

Action / Drama / Sport

46
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 40%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 76%
IMDb Rating 6.9 10 196572

Synopsis


Uploaded By: OTTO
November 20, 2021 at 09:49 AM

Cast

Rocky Krakoff as Rocky Jr.
Michael Pataki as Nicoli Koloff
James Brown as The Godfather of Soul
Dan Bradford as Ringside Fight Scene Extra-Russian
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU 2160p.WEB
841.4 MB
1280*694
English 2.0
PG-13
23.976 fps
1 hr 31 min
P/S 6 / 55
1.69 GB
1920*1040
English 5.1
PG-13
23.976 fps
1 hr 31 min
P/S 8 / 87
4.19 GB
3824*1600
English 5.1
PG-13
23.976 fps
1 hr 33 min
P/S 16 / 72

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by classicsoncall 7 / 10

"You know what you gotta do. Do it."

Pound for pound (as they say), this has to be the most cliché dialoged film I've ever seen. The one in my summary line came from Rocky's trainer Duke (Tony Burton) in his conversation with the champ in Russia, and other examples abound. There's the bedtime chat with Rocky's son - "We can't change what we are" and the 'no matter what' conversation with Adrian (Talia Shire) prior to the big bout in Moscow. Along with the generous helping of flashback scenes from the first three Rocky films, this picture took the lazy way out with no pretense of offering a compelling narrative built on character development or effective story telling.

That's not to say the picture didn't have it's moments. Probably the best sequence of the film had those juxtaposed scenes of Rocky and Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren) immersed in their training regimen; Rocky battling the elements in the harsh Russian countryside, Drago pumping up with the latest technologically advanced equipment and monitored to the max for ultimate physical output and endurance. The intended effect was palpable, the manufactured athlete would prove superior to the natural one.

Ultimately though, I can't get that excited about this installment in the franchise. Just about everything in the film screamed copycat for it's imitation of the first three films, from the flashback scenes to Apollo Creed's (Carl Weathers) impersonation of Muhammad Ali, to the physical impossibility of each man absorbing so much punishment in the ring and still standing. I know, it's just a movie, but this one created an unnecessary low in the series. I mean really, how can you take it seriously when Paulie (Burt Young) comes out with a line like "Blast this guys teeth out!"

Reviewed by Leofwine_draca 6 / 10

The least of the Rocky series so far, but it's still fun to watch

Although it isn't as iconic or as well made as the films which preceded it, ROCKY IV is still an entertaining film in the long-running franchise, a memorable Cold War encounter that tries to do something a little different than what's come before. Essentially it's the US vs. Russia conflict reduced to two boxers at the top of their game duking it out in the ring, and it has an air of '80s cheesiness about it that the previous sequel avoided: we could have done without the talking robot stuff, and the soundtrack just isn't memorable like in the films that came before. This ROCKY sequel is more about making bucks at the box office: it's bigger, slicker, more explosive, yes, but it lacks the gritty realism that the first two films contained. Halfway through the film there's a ten minute flashback sequence to the earlier movies that's been put in there for the fans alone.

Still, there's stuff that makes this film special anyway. Rocky's relationship with his family is as interesting as ever, and Paulie has a little more characterisation than in ROCKY III, even if he is still a background character. The character arcs are engaging, as we witness Apollo Creed come to the end of his long-running arc and Rocky himself battling fear for the first time in his life. Needless to say, the actors are fine: Stallone, Shire, Young and Weathers fit into their roles like a glove and don't let us down, and Tony Burton, Apollo's trainer, steps up to the plate with some heartening scenes that might indicate he's the new Mickey. The Russian villains are ice-cold: Brigitte Nielsen's here, just before she swapped to play the heroine in Stallone's COBRA, and Dolph Lundgren appears in his breakout turn as the robotic Russian boxer. He makes far more of an impact here than he did in his blink-and-you'll-miss-it appearance as a henchman in A VIEW TO A KILL.

Things I liked especially here were the training sequences, which swap locations to the icy Siberian wastes and feel fresh and inventive as a result, and the extended Rocky vs. Drago climax, which is one of the most exciting yet. The film as a whole has left me raring to see the next sequel.

Reviewed by SnoopyStyle 5 / 10

Classic 80s cheese

After beating Clubber Lang, Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) is content with the easy life. Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren) is the undefeated heavyweight world amateur champion from the Soviet Union. He is going into the pros and Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers) is itching to take on the challenge. Rocky advises against it but he stays by Apollo's side. Drago cold-heartedly kills Apollo in the ring when Rocky is unable to throw the towel in. Rocky climbs into the ring to avenge his friend's death and is even willing to go the Soviet Union. Also starring Brigitte Nielsen as Drago's wife. Talia Shire and Burt Young return once again.

This is high 80s cheese or low camp depending on your perspective. James Brown is performing 'Living in America'. There's even the Gorbachev double who starts the slow clap. Dolph Lundgren and Brigitte Nielsen look like superhuman specimens. Apollo's death is the only good drama in this. The rest is nothing more than formula.

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